Flap On The Periwinkle Bag

In today's video - Sewing The Toothbrush & Pastry Blender Bag - I talk about creating this periwinkle, cross-body bag... except for how I did the flap... shown below. The bag started with some left over scraps canvas from drop cloths that I used to cut out long triangles to make into teepees for my grandsons. I didn't want to waste the leftover pieces and I definitely didn't want to make a bunch of beige bags so I overdyed it.


For the flap, I started by stenciling dots onto a scrap using black acrylic paint mixed with textile medium. The stencil is a large one that I purchased at Michael's quite a while ago. I've come to really like it in part because all of the varied dot sizes are big enough for easy stenciling onto fabric.



I cut a strip the width I wanted for the flap, folded and pressed it in half, and then used a bowl to cut the curve. The dotted fabric was then fused to another scrap of the plain periwinkle fabric and the flap zigzag stitched into place forming the front of the flap. I used the edge of the foot to stitch a parallel line beside the curved shape.



The flap front was then placed right sides together with another piece of the periwinkle fabric. You can see that I didn't cut it to size or match the edges. I simple pinned them right sides together and then re-stitched on the same line placing the seam equal distance to the curved shaped on the front. The stitching goes down one side, around the curve, and up the other side. It does not go across the top where it will attach to the bag.



The seam was trimmed to about 1/4" and clipped around the curved edge before the flap was turned right side out through the opening that was left at the top.



I rolled and pressed the seam around the curve and then top stitched it 1/8" from the edge. I stitched another row along the edge of the zigzag stitches and then added a second row of zigzag stitching over the first when it didn't seem thick enough.



This is how the flap looks from the back. The straight section across the top where it will be sewn to the main body of the bag, is basted closed. It was then centered on the back of the bag right sides together and basted in place.

I used excess paint and a pastry blender to add linear details to another long scrap that was cut 2" wide to form the strap. The width was pressed raw edges to the middle and then in half again and stitched 1/8" from each long edge.




Here's the finished bag. I'm really happy with how it turned out and love the black design against the periwinkle fabric. The finished size is 10" wide at the top and 11" wide at the bottom, 9 1/2" high, and 1 1/2" deep.



The only part I'm not entirely happy with is the thickness of the strap. Canvas was not the best for such a narrow strap as once I managed to actually get it into the buckle slider, I couldn't slide it. In retrospect, I probably should have used something slimmer like black cotton, or the same print as the lining, or some faux leather. For this bag, I'll remove the buck tapes and slider and stitch the strap into the top of the bag with a fixed length that works for me. I am grateful for fun and play... on a hot day. It helps make things manageable.